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Florida Hospital Memorial Medical Center Selected to Join Baby-Friendly Hospital Initiative

Media Contact:
Lindsay Rew
Florida Hospital Volusia/Flagler
Cell: (386) 847-2253

DAYTONA BEACH – Thanks in part to a new nationwide breastfeeding initiative, expecting mothers in Volusia County will give their children a healthier start in life.

Florida Hospital Memorial Medical Center is the only hospital in the area selected to be among the first hospitals in the nation to join the EMPower Initiative, a hospital-based, quality improvement initiative focusing on maternity care practices leading to Baby-Friendly designation. This designation is awarded to hospitals that successfully implement the Ten Steps to Successful Breastfeeding. Created by a team of experts, these 10 steps include evidence-based practices to improve the start and continuation of breastfeeding.

Funded by the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, EMPower is aimed at increasing breastfeeding rates throughout the U.S. and encouraging optimal breastfeeding practices, with the ultimate goal of improving the public’s health.

The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends breastfeeding for at least 12 months.

“Mothers who choose to breastfeed decrease their children’s risk of infections, obesity, diabetes and cancer,” said Becky Vernon, Florida Hospital Memorial Medical Center director of women and children’s services. “Breastfeeding also benefits mothers by lowering their risk of breast and ovarian cancer, obesity and heart disease.”

As the only hospital in Volusia and Flagler counties selected to join the EMPower initiative, Florida Hospital Memorial Medical Center will receive ongoing support in breastfeeding practices from experienced coaches, as well as training and resource support in lactation education.

Florida Hospital Memorial Medical Center is in the midst of building a Level II neonatal intensive care unit (NICU) to care for sick and premature newborn infants. This $10 million construction project will add a 16-bed NICU with private rooms to the BirthCare Center’s current 10 Level 1 nursery beds. Additionally, neonatologists Dr. Mary Judith K. Allen, Dr. Winslade Bowen and Dr. Rene Santin already provide continuous neonatology coverage at the Daytona Beach hospital 24 hours a day, seven days a week.

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About Florida Hospital Memorial Medical Center
Florida Hospital Memorial Medical Center is a member of Adventist Health System, a faith-based health care organization with 45 hospital campuses and nearly 8,300 licensed beds in 10 states. With more than 1,800 employees and employed physicians, Florida Hospital Memorial Medical Center is a nonprofit health-care organization committed to hope, health and healing. A recipient of the 2012 Florida Governor’s Sterling Award for performance excellence, Florida Hospital Memorial Medical Center is a national leader in patient experience. Our locations include Florida Hospital Memorial Medical Center and Florida Hospital Cancer Institute in Daytona Beach, Florida Hospital Oceanside in Ormond Beach, an outpatient facility in Port Orange, and an imaging center in Ormond Beach. Additionally, Florida Hospital Oceanside is home to the area’s only inpatient rehabilitation facility with CARF accreditation for stroke care. For more information, call (386) 231-6000 or visit www.floridahospitalmemorial.org.

About the BirthCare Center
A lifetime of memories begins with the birth of your baby, and Florida Hospital is here to provide a smooth and safe experience, customized to the way you’ve always envisioned it. Along with national recognition and award-winning safety outcomes, the BirthCare Center offers all-private rooms — equipped to accommodate the entire birthing process from labor to delivery — and five-star amenities for your special day. Our state-of-the-art nursery and board-certified neonatologists are available 24/7, for newborns needing a critical-care level of attention. Our birth experience navigators stand ready to support you throughout your entire experience, from parent education classes and prenatal care, to labor and delivery and post-discharge support. For more information, call (386) 231-1400 or visit www.FloridaHospitalBabies.com.

Daytona Beach BirthCare Center Nurse Receives Happiest Baby Educator Certification

Media Contact:
Lindsay Rew
Florida Hospital Volusia/Flagler
Cell: (386) 847-2253

ORMOND BEACH – Amy DeCicco, a Registered Nurse in the BirthCare Center at Florida Hospital Memorial Medical Center in Daytona Beach, has received certification as a Certified Happiest Baby Educator.

The Happiest Baby Certification Program was developed by Dr. Harvey Karp, a nationally renowned pediatrician and child development specialist. Certified Happiest Baby Educators learn the methods developed by Dr. Harvey Karp to soothe and calm newborns, which can improve sleeping habits for both infants and parents. As a Certified Happiest Baby Educator, Amy DeCicco will be able to share her knowledge and experience with new families at the BirthCare Center at Florida Hospital Memorial Medical Center.

“This certification will provide me with the knowledge to assist parents in feeling more confident in caring for their newborn,” said DeCicco. “For example, through the course, I learned tools to calm a crying, fussy baby by turning on their calming reflex, tips for practicing safe sleep and reducing the risk of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS), and much more on newborn care.”

Amy DeCicco, an Ormond Beach resident, has been with Florida Hospital for 22 years. She is currently in the process of becoming a Basic Life Support instructor.

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About Florida Hospital Memorial Medical Center
Florida Hospital Memorial Medical Center is a member of Adventist Health System, a faith-based health care organization with 45 hospital campuses and nearly 8,300 licensed beds in 10 states. With more than 1,800 employees and employed physicians, Florida Hospital Memorial Medical Center is a nonprofit health-care organization committed to hope, health and healing. A recipient of the 2012 Florida Governor’s Sterling Award for performance excellence, Florida Hospital Memorial Medical Center is a national leader in patient experience. Our locations include Florida Hospital Memorial Medical Center and Florida Hospital Cancer Institute in Daytona Beach, Florida Hospital Oceanside in Ormond Beach, an outpatient facility in Port Orange, and an imaging center in Ormond Beach. Additionally, Florida Hospital Oceanside is home to the area’s only inpatient rehabilitation facility with CARF accreditation for stroke care. For more information, call (386) 231-6000 or visit www.floridahospitalmemorial.org.

About the BirthCare Center
A lifetime of memories begins with the birth of your baby, and Florida Hospital is here to provide a smooth and safe experience, customized to the way you’ve always envisioned it. Along with national recognition and award-winning safety outcomes, the BirthCare Center offers all-private rooms — equipped to accommodate the entire birthing process from labor to delivery — and five-star amenities for your special day. Our state-of-the-art nursery and board-certified neonatologists are available 24/7, for newborns needing a critical-care level of attention. Our birth experience navigators stand ready to support you throughout your entire experience, from parent education classes and prenatal care, to labor and delivery and post-discharge support. For more information, call (386) 231-1400 or visit www.FloridaHospitalBabies.com.

Free Daytona Beach Women’s Health Expo Will Include Health Screenings and Seminars on Pregnancy, Breast Cancer, Fitness, Nutrition, and Newborn Care

Media Contact:
Lindsay Rew
Florida Hospital Volusia/Flagler
Cell: (386) 847-2253

DAYTONA BEACH – Florida Hospital Memorial Medical Center will host a Women’s Health Expo for local Daytona Beach ladies of all ages on Sunday, September 28 from 1 p.m. to 4 p.m. The event is free and focuses on health and wellness, as well as pampering activities.

The Women’s Health Expo will include free seminars on breast cancer, fitness, heart health, nutrition and meal planning, and menopausal topics. Educators from the BirthCare Center will also be on hand for seminars on health during pregnancy and caring for a newborn. Attendees will be able to receive free glucose, peripheral artery disease (PAD), colon health, and blood pressure screenings.

In addition to the seminars and health screenings, there will also be free massages and manicures, and hairstyling tips from Veranda Pampering Salon.

The event will be held at Florida Hospital Memorial Medical Center, located at 301 Memorial Medical Parkway in Daytona Beach. Space is limited and RSVP is required. For information or to RSVP, call (386) 231-2229.

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About Florida Hospital Memorial Medical Center
Florida Hospital Memorial Medical Center is a member of Adventist Health System, a faith-based health care organization with 45 hospital campuses and nearly 8,300 licensed beds in 10 states. With more than 1,800 employees and employed physicians, Florida Hospital Memorial Medical Center is a nonprofit health-care organization committed to hope, health and healing. A recipient of the 2012 Florida Governor’s Sterling Award for performance excellence, Florida Hospital Memorial Medical Center is a national leader in patient experience. Our locations include Florida Hospital Memorial Medical Center and Florida Hospital Cancer Institute in Daytona Beach, Florida Hospital Oceanside in Ormond Beach, an outpatient facility in Port Orange, and an imaging center in Ormond Beach. Additionally, Florida Hospital Oceanside is home to the area’s only inpatient rehabilitation facility with CARF accreditation for stroke care. For more information, call (386) 231-6000 or visit www.floridahospitalmemorial.org.

Florida Hospital Memorial Medical Center Recognized by ACOG and March of Dimes for Reducing Early Elective Induction and Cesarean Deliveries

 

FHMMC_ACOG_Celebration

Media Contact:
Lindsay Rew
Florida Hospital Volusia/Flagler
Cell: (386) 847-2253

DAYTONA BEACH – On June 26, Florida Hospital Memorial Medical Center was honored by the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecologists (ACOG) District XII (Florida) and the March of Dimes for reducing the number of early elective inductions and cesarean deliveries.

Florida Hospital Memorial Medical Center is the only hospital in the area to meet the criteria to qualify for this distinction, which includes achieving a rate of 5 percent or lower for elective deliveries before 39 completed weeks of pregnancy and implementing policies to prevent such deliveries.

“Studies have shown that deliveries that are scheduled for convenience or other non-medical reasons may increase harm to infants, increase health care costs, and worsen medical outcomes,” said Dr. Robert Yelverton, Chair of ACOG District XII. “We are extremely pleased with Florida Hospital Memorial Medical Center’s participation.”

In an average week in Florida, 549 babies are born preterm and 29 die before their first birthday, many times as a result of their early births. Early elective deliveries can cause lifelong health challenges for the baby, including breathing difficulty, cerebral palsy, and learning disabilities. Even babies born just a few weeks early have higher rates of hospitalization and illness than full-term infants.

“We are delighted to recognize Florida Hospital Memorial Medical Center and present this commemorative banner to them for adhering to standards that directly benefit the health of babies,” said Dr. Karen Harris, Chair of the Program Services Committee for the March of Dimes Florida Chapter. “The last few weeks of pregnancy are extremely important for the baby’s brain and lung development, among other organs, so we want to commend this momentous achievement.”

“We’re proud of our expert team of physicians and nurses who tackled this important community issue. By developing and implementing department policies to avoid scheduling deliveries before 39 weeks of pregnancy, except when medically necessary, our BirthCare Center has supported best practices for reducing early elective deliveries,” said Becky Vernon, Florida Hospital Memorial Medical Center director of women and children’s services. “This is a reflection of our commitment to providing the best care for mothers and babies.”

March of Dimes and ACOG District XII (Florida) have also worked with the Florida Hospital Association, the Florida Perinatal Quality Collaborative and other partners to provide resources and support to hospitals across the state. This joint effort enabled many hospitals to make great progress in reducing their rates of early elective delivery.

For a list of hospitals that qualified for the special recognition banner and of those that have pledged to eliminate non-medically indicated deliveries before 39 weeks, visit www.marchofdimes.com/florida or www.acog12.org.

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About Florida Hospital Memorial Medical Center
Florida Hospital Memorial Medical Center is a member of Adventist Health System, a faith-based health care organization with 45 hospital campuses and nearly 8,300 licensed beds in 10 states. With more than 1,800 employees and employed physicians, Florida Hospital Memorial Medical Center is a nonprofit health-care organization committed to hope, health and healing. A recipient of the 2012 Florida Governor’s Sterling Award for performance excellence, Florida Hospital Memorial Medical Center is a national leader in patient experience. Our locations include Florida Hospital Memorial Medical Center and Florida Hospital Cancer Institute in Daytona Beach, Florida Hospital Oceanside in Ormond Beach, an outpatient facility in Port Orange, and an imaging center in Ormond Beach. Additionally, Florida Hospital Oceanside is home to the area’s only inpatient rehabilitation facility with CARF accreditation for stroke care. For more information, call (386) 231-6000 or visit www.floridahospitalmemorial.org.

The Benefits of Breastfeeding for Mom and Baby

DrReneSantinRene Santin, MD
Board-certified Neonatologist at Florida Hospital Memorial Medical Center

Having a baby leaves new parents with many decisions to make regarding how to raise the child. One of those decisions is whether or not to breastfeed.

The American Academy of Pediatrics recognizes exclusive breastfeeding as the best method of feeding and nurturing infants. Breastfeeding offers not only health benefits, but also savings of money and time.

Breastfeeding is low in cost, convenient and readily available. In contrast, formula is expensive and not as easy for babies to digest as breast milk. With breast milk, babies have the right amount of milk, which comes naturally available at the correct temperature.

The nutrients found in breast milk have many health benefits for newborns, including reducing the incidence of allergic reactions, constipation, diarrhea, ear infections, upper respiratory infections, colds and dental caries. But breastfeeding provides health benefits for mothers as well, helping return the uterus to pre-pregnant state much faster in addition to facilitating physical and emotional bonding between mother and baby.

Many moms believe they must follow a special diet when breastfeeding. This is not always true. Eat a variety of foods, as too much of one food can bother your baby’s tummy, and remember that moderation is key. While nursing moms should limit use of tobacco, alcohol, artificial sweeteners and weight-loss medications, other products may be okay in moderation. Juice and milk should be taken minimally, with water being mom’s main drink. Watch your intake of caffeine – found in coffee, tea, chocolate and soda – but one soda or cup of coffee is often acceptable.

One question that often troubles new mothers is how often to nurse and whether the baby is getting the right amount to eat. Babies may nurse anywhere from eight to 12 times in a 24-hour period, but feed on demand rather than on a strict hourly schedule.

Because you cannot measure the amount your baby is receiving from the breast, ask yourself these questions:

  • Is your baby satisfied after nursing? Baby should be content for at least one hour.
  • Is your baby urinating once for every day of age until day six? Then six to eight urinations a day (or more) after day six?
  • Is your baby giving three to five bowel movements a day (or more) in the first few weeks? As fat content in your breast milk increases, the bowel movements may slow down.
  • What color is the stool? Yellow and seedy means the baby is getting high fat content, which is what we want. Green means they are not getting enough fat while nursing. If stool is green, increase the length of time the baby feeds on one breast, and make sure the baby’s latch is sufficient.
  • Is the baby gaining weight? Babies should regain their birth weight within two weeks. After the first two weeks, baby should steadily gain four to seven ounces in weight each week.

Moms should call their lactation consultant or pediatrician in the event of the following issues, as they may warn of a more serious problem with the baby’s nursing:

  • Baby urinates fewer than six times per day after day six.
  • You do not feel your milk has come in by day five.
  • Your milk is in and you do not hear swallowing when the baby is nursing.
  • Your baby seems to be breastfeeding all the time without a one-hour break.
  • Your baby has not regained his/her birth weight by two weeks of age.
  • If one or both breast(s) is/are red and hot and you have a fever of 100 degrees or greater.

Florida Hospital Memorial Medical Center holds breastfeeding classes to help prepare mothers for nursing, as well as a breastfeeding support group where new mothers can come together to encourage each other and discuss questions they may be having. Our internationally board-certified lactation consultants are available before, during and after your baby’s birth to make your breastfeeding experience as smooth as possible. To learn more about our breastfeeding class, breastfeeding support group and other classes available at the BirthCare Center, visit www.FloridaHospitalBabies.org/classes.

Rene Santin, MD is a neonatologist with the BirthCare Center at Florida Hospital Memorial Medical Center. Board certified in pediatrics and neonatology, Dr. Santin has more than 15 years of experience in pediatric and neonatal care. To reach Florida Hospital Memorial Medical Center’s parent educators and internationally board-certified lactation consultants, call (386) 231-3152.

To suggest a medical topic or ask a question to be answered by a Florida Hospital physician, please e-mail marketing@fhmmc.org.

The ABC’s of Safe Sleep for your Baby: Preventing Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS)

CathySzymanskiCathy Szymanski, MSN, NNP-BC
Florida Hospital Memorial Medical Center
BirthCare Center

Safe sleep is such an important topic when it comes to taking care of our babies. But unfortunately, this is an area that causes much confusion for parents. Let’s take a look at the current guidelines from the American Academy of Pediatrics.

Placing all healthy babies on their back for sleep is recommended as the simplest and most effective way to lower the risk of Sudden Infant Death Syndrome (SIDS).

SIDS is the unexpected and unexplained death of an otherwise healthy baby under the age of one year. In the United States, SIDS is the leading cause of death in babies over one month of age, with the highest incidence occurring when babies are two to four months old. After that age, SIDS becomes less common.

The incidence increases during the cold weather. African American babies are twice as likely to die of SIDS, while American Indian/Native Alaskan babies are nearly three times more likely to die of SIDS than Caucasian babies. Also, more male babies die of SIDS than female babies.

While there is no single risk factor that will cause an infant to die of SIDS, there are several risk factors that, when combined, may cause an “at-risk” infant to succumb to SIDS. These risk factors include:

  • Smoking during pregnancy
  • Little or no prenatal care
  • Young mother (less than 20 years old)
  • Prematurity or low birth weight
  • Overheating of baby
  • Infant sleeping on stomach

Fortunately, the rate of SIDS is less than half what it was when the American Academy of Pediatrics started its “Back to Sleep” campaign in 1992. The American Academy of Pediatrics released additional recommendations to further reduce SIDS. These include:

  1. Use a firm, safety-approved mattress that is covered by a fitted sheet. Never place your baby to sleep on pillows, sheepskins, blankets or other soft surfaces.
  2. Keep all soft objects out of your baby’s sleep area. Do not use pillows or pillow-like crib bumpers. Keep all objects away from your baby’s face and head.
  3. Do not allow smoking around your baby.
  4. Keep your baby’s sleep area close to you, but do not share a bed with your baby. In fact, experts recommend that you put your baby in a crib, bassinet, cradle or bedside sleeper in the same room as you for the first six months.
  5. A clean pacifier is recommended when placing the infant to sleep at bedtime. However, do not force the baby to take it. If breastfeeding, wait to introduce the pacifier until the baby is one month old or used to breastfeeding.
  6. Do not let the baby get overheated. Dress the baby in light sleep clothes instead of a blanket. Maintain the air at a temperature that feels comfortable to you. You may also gently circulate the air with a fan.
  7. Avoid products that state they reduce the risk of SIDS, as most claims are unfounded.
  8. Do not use home monitors unless ordered by your baby’s doctor.
  9. To reduce the chance of your baby developing flat spots on the back of his or her head, provide your baby with supervised “tummy time” during the day. Avoid too much time in carriers, car seats and infant seats.
  10. Always remember that back is best for your baby’s sleep!

Know what to expect when you’re expecting. For more information about childbirth classes, mommy support groups, your pregnancy experience or the BirthCare Center at Florida Hospital Memorial Medical Center, visit www.FHbabies.com or call (386) 231-3152.

FHMMC_WomensCare_OpenHouse

Community Celebrates Dr. Landau’s Retirement and the Opening of Women’s Care OB/GYN

Media Contact:
Lindsay Rew
Florida Hospital Volusia/Flagler
Cell: (386) 847-2253

DAYTONA BEACH – On May 1, community members joined Florida Hospital Memorial Medical Center for the opening of Women’s Care OB/GYN, which also honored local OB/GYN Dr. Irwin Landau on his retirement.

After 25 years of serving the community, Landau has retired and left his practice to Florida Hospital Memorial Medical Center in Daytona Beach. Women’s Care OB/GYN will live on in its new location on the fourth floor of the hospital – down the hall from the state-of-the-art BirthCare Center.

At the event, attendees congratulated Landau on his retirement and reconnected with his staff who are now working with the group of physicians who have pledged to carry on his legacy: Dr. Larrain, Dr. Tapia-Santiago, Dr. Desai and Dr. Robertson.

Guests enjoyed delectable desserts and sparkling cider and toured the new office to learn about equipment, including 4D ultrasound available onsite.

“It has been an honor to work with Dr. Landau during his 25-year career in our community,” said Kim Rogers, Florida Hospital HealthCare Partners vice president. “We are proud to now carry on his legacy of top-notch care to mothers and babies at Women’s Care OB/GYN.”

The celebration coincided with the local rollout of Florida’s Statewide Medicaid Managed Care (SMMC) program, which represents a change in how individuals receive most health care services from Florida Medicaid. The event at Women’s Care OB/GYN served as an opportunity for patients with changing health care coverage to learn more about the office and services, as well as ask staff questions.

Photo Caption: On May 1, community members honored local OB/GYN Dr. Irwin Landau on his retirement and celebrated the new location of Women’s Care OB/GYN practice on the fourth floor of Florida Hospital Memorial Medical Center. The Florida Hospital Memorial Medical Center director of women and children’s services, Becky Vernon, marks the opening of the practice by cutting a ribbon with the group of physicians who have pledged to carry on his legacy. From left to right: Vernon, Dr. Irwin Landau, Dr. Cecille Tapia-Santiago, Dr. Ricardo Larrain, and Dr. Meetesh Desai.

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About Florida Hospital Memorial Medical Center
Florida Hospital Memorial Medical Center is a member of Adventist Health System, a faith-based health care organization with 45 hospital campuses and nearly 8,300 licensed beds in 10 states. With more than 1,800 employees and employed physicians, Florida Hospital Memorial Medical Center is a nonprofit health-care organization committed to hope, health and healing. A recipient of the 2012 Florida Governor’s Sterling Award for performance excellence, Florida Hospital Memorial Medical Center is a national leader in patient experience. Our locations include Florida Hospital Memorial Medical Center and Florida Hospital Cancer Institute in Daytona Beach, Florida Hospital Oceanside in Ormond Beach, an outpatient facility in Port Orange, and an imaging center in Ormond Beach. Additionally, Florida Hospital Oceanside is home to the area’s only inpatient rehabilitation facility with CARF accreditation for stroke care. For more information, call (386) 231-6000 or visit www.floridahospitalmemorial.org.

About the BirthCare Center
A lifetime of memories begins with the birth of your baby, and Florida Hospital is here to provide a smooth and safe experience, customized to the way you’ve always envisioned it. Along with national recognition and award-winning safety outcomes, the BirthCare Center offers all-private rooms — equipped to accommodate the entire birthing process from labor to delivery — and five-star amenities for your special day. Our state-of-the-art nursery and board-certified neonatologists are available 24/7, for newborns needing a critical-care level of attention. Our birth experience navigators stand ready to support you throughout your entire experience, from parent education classes and prenatal care, to labor and delivery and post-discharge support. For more information, call (386) 231-1400 or visit www.FloridaHospitalBabies.com.